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Clear day. This usually means that the day on which the Notice of Readiness is given and the day on which the notice period expires are not included in the notice period. In this situation the expression refers only to the notice period.

Colliery scale. Scale rates can be incorporated into a charterparty depending on the place of loading. These are rates, which are set by organisations, which publish standard-form- charterparties after discussion with shipowners and collieries at the ports of loading. The scale rates also contain rates for demurrage.

 

Container leasing. Containers may be offered for carriage of goods by the carriers themselves or the carriers may not actually own the containers, rather leasing them from lessors. Other parties, such as shippers, may also wish to lease a container. Therefore the containers can be owned by the ocean carriers, the lessors and also other transport operators, such as railway companies, shippers C themselves and large freight forwarders.

Contamination. If a cargo which is sensitive for some reason is damaged by the nature of another cargo or substance, the former is “contaminated”. This would be the situation if one grade of oil, e.g., a clean oil product on board a tanker, was loaded into a tank that was insufficiently cleaned.

Calls or Premiums. Some mutual associations term the payments for cover as “calls” while others term them as “premiums”. The concept of mutuality is that each member protects the others and this is done by levying “calls” rather than the businessman’s “premium”.

Cargo-Quality. A description in the bill of lading as to the quality of goods does not bind the carrier. The person signing and issuing the bill of lading is not considered to have the expertise nor the duty to ascertain quality. The shipowner can adduce evidence to show that the goods were not of the quality stated on the bill of lading.

 

Cargo and bills of lading. The bill of lading is essentially a receipt for cargo. Therefore the statements in the document connecting the bill of lading and cargo are of great importance to the buyer of the goods, the consignee or endorsee, the banks in a documentary credits system and the possibility of liability of the earner. Statements can refer to the nature, condition, quality and quantity of the cargo.

 

Customary. This word usually refers to the rate at which cargo operations are to take place and may affect the time the vessel is made available by the owner for these operations.

Collision and dock damage. Excess collision liability. Proportion of collision liability relating to wreck removal, dock damage or oil pollution caused by the other ship.

 

CIM. The full, French name for this international Convention which relates to the carriage of goods by rail is “Convention Internationale Concernant le Transport des Marchandises par Chemin de Fer”. The CLM Convention applies mostly to intermodal transport in Europe. The contract of carriage under the CIM is the “CIM consignment note”, similar to a bill of lading for ocean carriage.

 

Colliery working days. This is a description of type of laytime depending on the ordinary working hours of the colliery from which the coal will be delivered to the vessel. The working days are related to normal times and in normal circumstances. Colliery holidays will be "holidays" if an exception to laytime exists in the charterparty (for example, "SHEX"). If the workers in a colliery are on strike, the delay is not excepted from the laytime, unless, of course, there is an appropriate "strike clause", unless a Sunday or holiday occurs during the strike.

 

Paramount clause. (Also termed Clause Paramount.) This clause is generally found in a bill of lading but can also be found in a charterparty. The main purpose of such a clause is to incorporate the terms and conditions of the Hague or Hague-Visby Rules (or the Hamburg Rules) into the document which is (or which evidences) the contract of carriage of goods by sea. The Paramount clause can also incorporate particular legislation, such as the United States Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1936.

 

CY (Container yard). This is the container base from where the carriage will commence or where the ocean carriage ends. It is usually in the container port facility and is under the control of the ocean carrier. 

The CY can also be under the control of other carriers, for example, at a railway yard or at an airport.

 

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